Children Grow Up Too Fast

 

In the 21st century children are growing up too quickly, and they are becoming sexualised too early in their lives. Music videos, music, films and TV prompt children to begin to think about matters that they shouldn’t be at such a young age. Artists such as Katy Perry, Rihanna and  Lady Gaga have fans as young as 7 and with their music often being provocative, they are evoking early development.

However, the main difference between young children now than children 10-15 years ago, when I grew up for instance, is the augmented access children have to factors that can advance their years too early. The internet has become an innate part of our lives and thus youngsters have learnt how to use the internet and can access things that previous generations could only access later in their lives. The internet gives children access to a wealth of information, often without parents’ knowledge, unless filters have been placed on their internet searching. This increase in information given to children can have negative emotional consequences to children.

Music videos is a significant example of this, Rihanna’s music videos often have strong sexual connotations and children pick up on this very quickly. Films seem to have more lackadaisical ratings, resulting in stronger content, that is not only sexual but also violent, infiltrating into our children’s minds. Indeed, video games are notorious for being extremely violent, young children play these games and this, I think, has an affect on their well being that has not yet been fully explored.

The danger of chat rooms seems to have been covered by news outlets describing kidnapping and other awful scenarios, but the danger of information being accessed by children at such a young age is still something that has yet to be covered, and the danger realised, by society.

The internet is a relatively new factor that has been introduced into society and I think with time people will begin to realise the dangers that it can pose to young, unassuming children. Nonetheless, it is worth making advancements towards improving the filter systems available on the internet to prevent children from accessing certain sites and raising awareness about the dangers that the internet can pose.

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The Pressure To Be Thin

I’ve been reading and following more and more people on wordpress as the days continue and I’ve begun to realise that I’m most definitely not the only one who notices the ridiculous pressure on people today to be thin. Myself being a teenager I am more apt to observe this trend amongst young people.

I primarily blame the celebrity culture for imposing this need to be thin on young people. Sites such as www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/index.html  constantly glorifty slim and trim bodies and there are an exorbitant amount of size 0 models on catwalks and photoshoots. Photoshopping in magazines and online articles also only furthers the view ‘the thinner the better.’ Photoshopping can be even more damaging to individuals, and society as a whole, as these portrayals are not even realistic and thus become unachievable.

The indoctrination of young minds of what is the correct body shape is  happening at younger and younger ages. In my opinion, this is mainly due to over prevalence of the internet in our society and the wide access that young people (and when I say young people I mean between 8-16, but mainly the 8-12 bracket) have to articles and pictures that constantly refer to weight and the ‘perfect beach body.’ It is wrong that children as young as 7 or 8 have begun questioning their body shapes when they should simply be enjoying life and being healthy, not worrying about what they are eating.

There is an ongoing trend of anorexia and bulimia in western cultures, these diseases or both demoralising and life threatening to individuals and family and friends affected. Even those who aren’t fully affected by an eating disorder can still have their quality of life reduced, as they constantly worry about what they are eating, their calorie consumption and their figure.

I’m an advocate for healthy living, I hate diets and don’t think they actually work. I’m a believer in everything in moderation. Eat healthily and exercise to maintain fitness and health, nothing compulsively. This, I believe, should be enough for society. After all, no one is perfect.

Sure, thin and attractiveness sell, but are we really placing profit and commercial value above our children’s’ and even our adults’ mental and physical well being?