The Media

media

So many of us think that we are above the media and press brainwashing. We think we can interpret advertisements and make our own decisions based on the product. We think that we can develop our own opinion regarding the news and we think that we cannot be manipulated by propaganda. However, I would argue the opposite.

First and foremost I would like to address advertisements. They have become all pervading in our lives. They are everywhere. There is no escaping them. This is mainly due to the variety of forms that adverts can take. They can be found on billboards, magazines, television, radio, on the internet and newspapers. Companies who develop adverts have established ways in which the product they are broadcasting can subconsciously enter your mind, even if you aren’t paying much attention. Technology has exacerbated this culture with adverts on social media sites, in particular Facebook, which are aimed at your search and profile history. Thus making the adverts that much more effective. This also continues the commercialised culture of society.

The attack on our subconscious is also undertaken in the news. The newspaper headlines naturally distort our view of the news. Emotive headlines are common and thus show the perspective of the newspaper and journalist that is then pushed onto the reader, often subconsciously. I have found many instances of this, one of which was in the Daily Mail today and stated, “This is legalised murder, claim family as judges rule doctors can let Grandad die.” The use of “Grandad” here is emotive as it suggested familial ties rather than using the more objective term “man”.

Finally, the use of propaganda for humanitarian campaigns also play on our emotions. This is through accusatory language such as the use of “you” which makes the reader feel as though they are the only ones who can help. Humanitarian campaigns also use images of suffering that evoke guilt and the desire to help, this is the same as quantifying things that you buy in your life compared to how much they can help in underprivileged areas. An example of this is the cost of a coffee a week can save a life. I’m not saying this kind of humanitarian campaigning is wrong, as it certainly works and it is vital that humanitarian campaigns raise money, I just found it interesting to assess their fundraising techniques.

It is important to remember that we live in a society that is becoming increasingly globalised and commercialised and the press, media and campaigners react accordingly. Advertisements and propaganda have become even more important in the last few years due to the economic climate not being conducive to spending or donating money. Thus, naturally, this kind of press and advertising has been exacerbated in recent years.

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Children Grow Up Too Fast

 

In the 21st century children are growing up too quickly, and they are becoming sexualised too early in their lives. Music videos, music, films and TV prompt children to begin to think about matters that they shouldn’t be at such a young age. Artists such as Katy Perry, Rihanna and  Lady Gaga have fans as young as 7 and with their music often being provocative, they are evoking early development.

However, the main difference between young children now than children 10-15 years ago, when I grew up for instance, is the augmented access children have to factors that can advance their years too early. The internet has become an innate part of our lives and thus youngsters have learnt how to use the internet and can access things that previous generations could only access later in their lives. The internet gives children access to a wealth of information, often without parents’ knowledge, unless filters have been placed on their internet searching. This increase in information given to children can have negative emotional consequences to children.

Music videos is a significant example of this, Rihanna’s music videos often have strong sexual connotations and children pick up on this very quickly. Films seem to have more lackadaisical ratings, resulting in stronger content, that is not only sexual but also violent, infiltrating into our children’s minds. Indeed, video games are notorious for being extremely violent, young children play these games and this, I think, has an affect on their well being that has not yet been fully explored.

The danger of chat rooms seems to have been covered by news outlets describing kidnapping and other awful scenarios, but the danger of information being accessed by children at such a young age is still something that has yet to be covered, and the danger realised, by society.

The internet is a relatively new factor that has been introduced into society and I think with time people will begin to realise the dangers that it can pose to young, unassuming children. Nonetheless, it is worth making advancements towards improving the filter systems available on the internet to prevent children from accessing certain sites and raising awareness about the dangers that the internet can pose.

Getting the hang of wordpress

So I’ve begun to get the gist of  wordpress. I’ve found a few blogs that I really like and resonate with me. They make me feel more confident that my views aren’t in the complete minority and there are others in similar boats. The internet it turns out isn’t just a way to bring your self confidence down that everyone seems to be doing better than you, but can also boost your self esteem and bring more ideas to the forefront of your mind.

As you can see I’ve also learnt how to bold and italic words, and the effect they can have. Yes, I’m getting technical of course.

I definitely feel that feminism and the stigma that surrounds it will be a topic that I cover more, along with views about the UK benefit system. I’m told I’m right wing.. (pretty rare for a student apparently) but I’m not too keen on being labelled. We’ll see what happens when I actually start writing…